Abraham Lincolns Life Lincoln Politics

Lincoln Speaks

Lincoln Speaks: Words That Transformed a Nation, an exhibition co-organized by the Morgan Library & Museum and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, was on display at the Morgan Library & Museum, January 23 through June 7, 2015. A complete online version of the exhibition, along with supplemental materials, is available right here on abrahamlincoln.org. More than eighty items from his remarkable life--speeches, letters, legal writings, personal notes, and more--are included in the exhibition.

Read reviews on Lincoln Speaks in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal.


Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln In Depth

President Lincoln and Patronage

When Abraham Lincoln sent aide John G. Nicolay in July 1860 to confer with an anxious Indiana politician, he wrote out instructions that stated: “Tell him my motto is ‘Fairness to all.’ But commit me to nothing.” Nicolay added: “When, in the following December, after…

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Frederick Douglass

Douglass was not a proponent of any compromise where slavery was concerned, but his interaction with Mr. Lincoln convinced him over time of the wisdom of the President’s deliberate movements toward emancipation…

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Changes in the White House

Colonel of Zouaves, Elmer Ellsworth was killed while taking down a Confederate flag in Alexandria, Virginia. Ellsworth was a Chicagoan who was a close friend of President Lincoln’s family and accompanied him on his pre-inaugural trip to Washington. He moved into the White House and played regularly with the Lincoln…

DAILY ABRAHAM LINCOLN BLOG

November 30, 1864 Attorney General Edward Bates writes: “I resigned my office of Atty Genl. [of the] U.S. to take effect No 30, 1864, having served just 3 years and 3/4. Some months before[,] I made known to the President my wish to retire as soon as he should be reelected [...]...Read More
Sun, Nov 30, 2014
Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War
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Abraham Lincoln:
The Impact on the War, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
The proclamation, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
New Years Day Reception

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Kansas-Nebraska and the Senate

Mr. Lincoln moved quickly to mobilize his friends in the days after the legislative elections. “During the anxious moments that intervened between the general election and the assembling of the Legislature he…”

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Terrorist Conspiracy: Hotel Bombings

Confederate agents planned a desperate act of terrorism in New York City for Election Day, 1864. Fortunately, their plot was aborted by good Union intelligence and bad Confederate planning. The plot had been hatched by…

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Abraham Lincoln and The Eighth Circuit

His friends believed Abraham Lincoln loved life on the Eighth Circuit. There was a simple camaraderie on the circuit that Mr. Lincoln enjoyed as he moved from town to town each spring and fall. “The vanity of human wishes, it appears to me, could in no case…

Featured Article

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They were big men. George Washington was 6-foot-3. Abraham Lincoln was almost 6-4. Their ambitions were equally big — first for themselves, and then for the nation they would lead.

As young men, both future presidents trained as surveyors at periods when Americans were preoccupied by the development of the frontier and the acquisition of land. Historian John Ferling wrote: “Starting around age fifteen, George learned surveying through self-help books, such as `The Young Man’s Companion,’ and it is probable that he was tutored by some of the surveyors employed by the Fairfaxes.” In his search for self-improvement, 16-year-old Washington famously wrote out the rules for life and behavior from “Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation.” That pursuit would continue the rest of his life.

Surveying helped define both men. In 1834 Abraham Lincoln was named as a deputy surveyor of Sangamon County in Illinois; George Washington had been appointed as Culpepper County surveyor in 1749. Ferling observed that, “surveying … was a respectable and often lucrative occupation in Washington’s Virginia, as the population was growing and new frontiers were opening steadily.”

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